Medicare, Transsexual Surgery, and the office of Dr. Reed

                                         Medicare, Transsexual Surgery, and the office of Dr. Reed

Dear prospective patients who are on Medicare or are considering Medicare to fund their transsexual surgery,

Yesterday, we got a verbal update from Medicare (phone call) and their policy is always evolving.   As of November or December, 2014, our office is no longer going to be listed as an accept assignment office.

Allowing a month for transition, after either December, 2014 or January, 2015, we will still see Medicare patients, but they will get the check, which may be 10 to 15% less than if they went to a doctor who accepts Medicare assignment.  The catch is, doubtful you will find a doctor who will doing MTF vaginoplasty for the 1,800 or so Medicare has allowed.

What this means is with each Medicare patient we will have a written agreement that we are not accepting assignment.  The patient will get the check directly from Medicare.   To schedule surgery which will be done at the hospital for Medicare patients, simply call Anne, our amiable office manager.  Our fees will be reduced, because the hospital is the facility (not our office)  – Medicare takes care of that, and anesthesia is also provided by the hospital.  A savings of several 1000 s of dollars.  We will fill out your Medicare form, send it in, provide you with a copy.  So you will be paid directly by the US government.

We have always been looking for a comfortable way to make Medicare work and I think for now this is it.

Should you have any questions, please call our office and speak with Anne.  We will try to make your dreams come true at a real savings.

Sincerely,

Harold M. Reed, M.D.
305-865-2000

 

Medicare update (July 25, 2014)

                             Medicare, Transsexual Surgery, and the office of Dr. Reed
Dear prospective patients who are on Medicare or are considering Medicare to fund their transsexual surgery,
Yesterday, we got an verbal update from Medicare (phone call) and their policy is always evolving.   As of November or December, 2014, our office is no longer going to be listed as an “accept assignment office.”
Allowing a month for transition, after either December, 2014 or January, 2015, we will still see Medicare patients, but they will get the check, which may be 10 to 15% less than if they went to a doctor who accepts Medicare assignment.  The catch is, doubtful you will find a doctor who will doing MTF vaginoplasty for the 1,800 or so Medicare has allowed.
What this means is with each Medicare patient we will have a written agreement that we are not accepting assignment.  The patient will get the check directly from Medicare.   To schedule surgery which will be done at the hospital for Medicare patients, simply call Anne, our amiable office manager.  Our fees will be reduced, because the hospital is the facility (not our office)  – Medicare takes care of that, and anesthesia is also provided by the hospital.  A savings of several 1000?s of dollars.  We will fill out your Medicare form, send it in, provide you with a copy.  So you will be paid directly by the US government.
We have always been looking for a comfortable way to make Medicare work and I think for now this is it.
Should you have any questions, please call our office and speak with Anne.  We will try to make your dreams come true at a real savings.
Sincerely,
Harold M. Reed, M.D.
305-865-2000

 

Eric from the Philippines seeking a sponsor

hi im eric i am  26 years old and im looking for sponsor like organization for helping me to raise money for transgender. im living here in phillipines and here pls help me to reach my dreams thank you.

 

July 22, 2014

Good afternoon Eric,

How do you spell Philippines, your native country?

Why is it that 40% of American women who get married never work seriously again in their life in a full time cost of living paying job?  Their husbands are doing this for them.  These are social skills that people acquire.

Sponsors are people you know.  People who will pitch in and help you out because they believe in you.  50% of our patients come in with a sponsor who is seated right next to them.  Could be a parent, a loved one, a spouse, a friend, a church group, a business partner.  To  think someone out of the clear blue sky is going to give you several thousand dollars, to someone they do not know is fantasy land.

What about your next financial need, a car, a home, food, shelter, how are you ever going to make it happen.

Sincerely,

Harold M. Reed, M.D.
305-865-2000

Meet the Transgender Grand Marshals of Pride 2014!

 

Mom’s speech challenges bias against her transgender 6-year-old

WATCH: Mom’s speech challenges bias against her transgender 6-year-old

Content

Debi Jackson, the mother of a 6-year-old transgender girl named A.J., gave a speech about her daughter several months ago at Unity Temple on the Plaza in Kansas City. A video of the speech has gone viral with more than 200,000 views, and was shared in an article from the Huffington Post and in a tweet from Ricky Martin.

In her speech, Debi talks about her process of accepting that A.J. is transgender, and supporting her in living life as the girl she knows she is. At 3-years-old, A.J. began asking to wear girls’ clothes, and eventually told her parents that she is a girl. Debi realized they couldn’t hold A.J. back any longer, as she was showing signs of depression and refusing to leave the house in boys’ clothes.

“The day I let her to go school in girl clothes, she was happier than I had seen in a very long time. The kids were great, and the teachers were awesome,” said Debi. “But then the kids went home and told their parents, and they weren’t so great after that. Adult bigotry had influenced them.”

The last part of Debi’s speech addressed the hurtful comments she has heard upon telling people that her daughter is transgender. Debi wiped away tears as she spoke about those who claim that God does not love transgender people.

“My God taught us to love one another,” said Debi. “My daughter is a girl in her heart. She knows it. God knows it. And that’s good enough for me.”

WATCH THE FULL VIDEO OF DEBIE JACKSON’S SPEACH

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-oIuw3yIyhI&feature=player_embedded

 

“Obama executive order extends protections to about about 14 million workers…”

Obama Gives Protection to Gay, Transgender Workers

 

WASHINGTON — Jul 21, 2014, 11:09 AM ET
By NEDRA PICKLER Associated Press

President Barack Obama on Monday gave employment protection to gay and transgender workers in the federal government and its contracting agencies, after being convinced by advocates of what he called the “irrefutable rightness of your cause.”

“America’s federal contracts should not subsidize discrimination against the American people,” Obama said at a signing ceremony from the White House East Room. He said it’s unacceptable that being gay is still a firing offense in most places in the United States.

Until last month, Obama long resisted pressure to pursue an executive anti-discrimination covering federal contractors in the hope that Congress would take more sweeping action banning anti-LGBT workplace discrimination across the landscape of employment in America. A bill to accomplish that goal — the Employment Non-Discrimination Act — passed the Senate last year with some Republican support, but has not been taken up by the GOP-controlled House. “We’re here to do what we can to make it right,” Obama said.

Since Obama announced that he would sign the orders, he’s faced pressure from opposing flanks over whether he would include an exemption for religious organizations. He decided to maintain a provision that allows religious groups with federal contracts to hire and fire based upon religious identity, but not give them any exception to consider sexual orientation or gender identity. Churches also are able to hire ministers as they see fit.

Obama’s action comes on the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in the Hobby Lobby case that allowed some religiously oriented businesses to opt out of the federal health care law’s requirement that contraception coverage be provided to workers at no extra charge. Obama advisers said that ruling has no impact on non-discrimination policies in federal hiring and contracting.

Obama said 18 states and more than 200 local governments already ban employment discrimination based on sexual orientation, as well as a majority of Fortune 500 companies. But he noted that more states allow same-sex marriage than prohibit gay discrimination in hiring.

“It’s not just about doing the right thing, it’s also about attracting and retaining the best talent,” Obama said.

The change for federal contracting will impact some 24,000 companies with 28 million workers, or one-fifth of the U.S. workforce. Many large federal contractors already have employment policies barring anti-gay workplace discrimination. However, the Williams Institute at UCLA Law School estimates that the executive order would extend protections to about 14 million workers whose employers or states currently do not have such nondiscrimination policies.

While few religious organizations are among the biggest federal contractors, they do provide some valued services, including overseas relief and development programs and re-entry programs for inmates leaving federal prisons.

Obama amended two executive orders. The first, signed by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965, prohibits federal contractors from discriminating based on race, religion, gender or nationality in hiring. President George W. Bush had amended Johnson’s order in 2002 to add the exemption for religious groups.

Obama added sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of protections, and ordered the Labor Department to carry out the order. Administration officials said that means the change will probably take effect by early next year.

Obama also amended an order signed by President Richard Nixon in 1969 to prevent discrimination against federal workers based on race, religion, gender, nationality, age or disability. President Bill Clinton added sexual orientation, and Obama will include gender identity in a change that will immediately take effect.

Transgender Orchiectomy: FAQ

What is an Orchiectomy?

An orchiectomy (spelled orchidectomy in British English), is the medical term for the surgical procedure to remove one or more of the testicles. A bilateral orchiectomy is the removal of both testicles and is commonly referred to as castration.

An orchiectomy doesn’t remove the penis, which would be a penectomy. It is also different from a vasectomy, which leaves the testicles and their function intact while still causing sterilization. While sex reassignment surgery (SRS) for male to female transsexuals also removes the testicles and penis, it is different because it also creates a functional vagina in the process.


Why Do Some Trans Women Get Orchiectomies?:

Male to female (MTF) transsexuals, as well as some other transgendered people, sometimes undergo orchiectomy. An orchiectomy can be done before or instead of sex reassignment surgery (SRS). This is an option for those that either can’t afford, aren’t in good enough health or do not want to have SRS.

 It is often recommended to get a bilateral orchiectomy when antiandrogens such as spironolactone or cyproterone acetate cause unwanted and dangerous side effects. Kidney, liver, and thyroid damage are common after long term use. There is also an increased risk of blood clots, hyperkalemia and some people are allergic to the medications.

The Benefits for Transgendered Women Are:

1. Ability to stop taking antiandrogens and reduce estrogen

2. Increased health from reduction of medications

3: Saves money on medications

4: Might be able to legally change sex with an orchiectomy

5: Easier to “tuck” and hide genitals

6: Taken more seriously by society

7: Increased body image

8: Improved and faster feminization

9: Can no longer have testicular pain

10: Never detransition even if you can’t take medications

Why do men need circumcision revisions?

July 16, 2014

 

Hello Dr Reed,

My name is Jim and I was hoping you could answer a quick question.

I am currently researching circumcision and have found information online

in regards to circumcision revisions.  Is there a common reason or reasons

that men would need to have a circumcision revised?

 

July 17, 2014

 

Good morning Jim,

Thank you for your interest in what we do here at the Reed Centre.

10% of our patients request revisions of previous circumcisions for

reasons including: white cross hatch suture marks (scars), uneven cut,

loose skin covering penis when flacid or a waddle of skin on the underside

of the penis.

 

We allow the patient to bring in a work sheet  to which we add

recommendations to produce an optimal cosmetic result.

Healing time is similar if not faster than a original circumcision. Patient

feedback is uniformly satisfactory.

 

If you have any further questions please feel free to contact via

email or telephone.

Have a great afternoon,

Harold M. Reed M.D.

305 865 2000

Emmys make history with first transgender acting nominee

Emmys Make History With First Transgender Acting Nominee

          9:07 AM PDT 7/10/2014 by Philiana Ng

      “Orange Is the New Black” star Laverne Cox, who told THR she was on “cloud nine,” scored a nomination for her stint on the Netflix dramedy.

Laverne Cox Orange is the New Black - H 2014

 

 

Netflix
Laverne Cox on “Orange Is the New Black”

The Emmy Awards made history Thursday when the TV Academy nominated its first openly transgender actor.

Orange Is the New Black star Laverne Cox, who plays Sophia Burset on the Netflix prison dramedy from creator Jenji Kohan, received a nomination in the outstanding guest actress in a comedy series category — the first time an openly transgender actress has been recognized for an Emmy, according to the TV Academy. Her nomination is one of a dozen Orange Is the New Black received, including outstanding comedy series and acting recognition for stars Taylor Schilling, Kate Mulgrew, Uzo Aduba and Natasha Lyonne.

 

“I’m on cloud nine. I’m through the roof,” the actress, who recently graced the cover of Time magazine, told The Hollywood Reporter early Thursday. The cultural impact of Orange, which launched its second season in June, has not been not lost on Cox: “We’re definitely part of a moment.”

“What a wonderful, wonderful day for Orange and for black trans-women,” she said. Referring to the attention the series has received, she added: “People are obsessed. Would you ever have thought a show about a women’s prison would have this moment? It’s unbelievable.”

Her Orange co-stars also celebrated Cox’s Emmy nomination, with Mulgrew saying that “it’s recognition of a community that very much needs and wants to be recognized, understood and rewarded.” She added: “I think that Laverne as both an activist and an actor is doing a Herculean job of bringing transgenderism to the forefront of American politics and culture.”

 

Added Aduba, with whom Cox had already swapped congratulatory notes: “I love Laverne, and she’s done just an amazing thing for the trans community, period, end of story.”

She continued: “The fact that Jenji had the bravery — and the team at Netflix — to put someone on television like Laverne, like these women of color, with so many different sexual orientations, it’s exciting. I’m just thankful that they’ve recognized her, that’s all.”

GLAAD also praised Cox’s Emmy nomination and applauded the fact that it’s been a strong year for openly gay actors, including Matt Bomer, Jim Parsons, Kate McKinnon, Sarah Paulson, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Nathan Lane and Joe Mantello. (Earlier this year, Cox received the Stephen F. Kolzak Award for her LGBT activism at the 25th annual GLAAD Media Awards.)

 

“From gracing the cover of Time magazine, to now becoming the first openly transgender person to be nominated for an Emmy in an acting category, Laverne Cox continues to break barriers,” said GLAAD president and CEO Sarah Kate Ellis. “Today, countless transgender youth will hear the message that they can be who they are and still achieve their dreams — nothing is out of reach. Laverne’s success on a hit series is a clear indication that audiences are ready for more trans characters on television.”

While Cox is the first openly transgender person to receive an Emmy acting nomination, hers is not the first portrayal of a transgender person to be recognized with an Emmy nomination. The first openly transgendered person to be nominated for an Emmy was Chaz Bono who was nominated as a producer for the documentary Becoming Chaz in 2011.

Robert Reed, best known as father Mike Brady on The Brady Bunch, received a nomination in the lead actor category for a single appearance in a drama or comedy series in 1976 for his portrayal of a transgender doctor on CBS’ Medical Center. 

 

Also, in 1986, Vanessa Redgrave received an Emmy nomination for best actress in a miniseries or television film for her portrayal of transgender tennis player Renee Richards in the CBS TV movie Second Serve. Also, P.J. Torokvei, a transgender woman, received an Emmy nomination as a producer on WKRP in Cincinnati.

While several people have been nominated for portraying transgender characters in films, only one has ever won an Oscar for such a performance: Hilary Swank, for Boys Don’t Cry, in 1999.

Cox’s character, Litchfield’s resident salon maven, found herself behind bars after committing credit card fraud, which she perpetrated to pay for her gender reassignment surgery. She struggles to receive adequate hormone therapy while in prison but tries her best to maintain a relationship with her wife and son on the outside as they continue to come to terms with her sexuality.

Lacey Rose, Ashley Lee, Scott Feinberg, Bryn Elise Sandberg and Lesley Goldberg contributed to this report.

Email: Philiana.Ng@THR.com Twitter: @insidethetube

April Ashley: ‘Portrait of a Lady’ Explores the life of Britain’s first transgender icon

‘April Ashley: Portrait Of A Lady’ Explores The Life Of Britain’s First Transgender Icon

Born in 1935, April Ashley was a successful model by the time she turned 26, gracing the pages of magazines like Vogue in nothing but her underwear. By that age, she had also undergone one of the first gender reassignment surgeries in Morocco, leaving her life as George Jamieson behind her to become one of the world’s first visible LGBT icons.

An ongoing exhibit at Liverpool Museum, titled “April Ashley: Portrait Of A Lady,” is paying tribute to Britain’s early transgender advocate. Featuring photographs and documents from the 1930s to today, the show delves into the Liverpool native’s transformative journey, from a confused child to a fashion figure to a lauded leader of the UK trans community.

ashley

April Ashley 1964, Credit: Vic Singh, REX Features
 

The exhibit traces a timeline beginning with Ashley’s tormented childhood, a tumultuous period dominated by intolerant schoolyard bullies, and a young adulthood in harsh psychiatric treatment. Ashley was steadfast in her belief that she was a woman trapped within a male body, and began working in a nightclub in her early 20s to earn enough money for gender reassignment surgery — a procedure that only eight people had undergone before her.

She was finally able to afford the surgery when she was 25, traveling to a clinic in Casablanca run by Dr. Georges Burou. “I knew by then that I would kill myself if I didn’t have [the surgery],” Ashley recalled in an interview with The Telegraph’s John Preston. “So when I had the money I wrote to Dr. Borou and he said, ‘Please come over when you want.’ When I saw him, he said, ‘Why would a beautiful girl like you want to become a man?’ I said, ‘No, no, Dr Borou — it’s the other way round.’”

Following the surgery, she quickly rose through the ranks of the modeling world, working with famous photographers such as David Bailey. Slipping into the role of a female sex symbol beside lingerie models like Christine Keeler, the joyful period was interrupted only when a friend exposed Ashley as a man to a British media outlet. The news tragically amounted to a scandal, and Ashley never worked in fashion again.

jamie

George Jamieson (center) with brother and sister, 1945
 

But becoming a public object of desire was hardly her lasting triumph compared to the decades of events that followed in Ashley’s life. After suffering a divorce from a man who annulled their marriage on the grounds that his wife was a biological man, Ashley watched as the transgender community earned the right to legally change their status on official documents in 1999. “I feel free at last,” she is quoted as saying.

Her private life was a mixture of glamour and strife — she was a partner in a restaurant business and she claimed to have had dalliances with Omar Shariff and Grayson Perry. At the same time she worked as a hostess here and a waitress there without much financial security. Nevertheless, she remained an oft-watched celebrity, breaking taboos along the way until she was awarded a MBE (Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire), a coveted honor bestowed upon her for her advocacy work in LGBT rights with the UK-based group, Homotopia.

She was born into a world where boys who acted like girls were beaten and reviled and scorned,” wrote Jonathan Jones in a recent article. “She lived into –- and helped create –- a world where everyone has the right to the life they need to live. Isn’t that, quite simply, liberating?”

Scroll through photos from “April Ashley: Portrait Of A Lady,” on view at Liverpool Museum from September 27, 2013 until September 21, 2013. Let us know your thoughts on the project in the comments.

ashley
April Ashley 1958 at La Carrousel, courtesy of April Ashley
april
April backstage at Carrousel De Paris, 1958
 

car

Le Carrousel promo card for Toni Arthur (April’s former name), 1958
 

ashley

April Ashley, 1959, courtesy of April Ashley
 

ashley

April Ashley on tour for Le Carrousel 1959
 

ashley
April Ashley, 1962, courtesy of April Ashley
 

mother

April Ashley with mother at London Airport 1962, Credit: Topfoto
 

shley

April Ashley Modelling London 1964, Credit: Vic Singh, Rex Features
 

ashley